Miles Coverdale (manos74) wrote,
Miles Coverdale
manos74

Socio-logical fallacies

Inspired by various recent dramas on brutal_honesty and elsewhere...

ARGUMENT FROM AVENUE Q:

A particular type of naturalistic fallacy, named for the song "Everyone's A Little Bit Racist" from the Avenue Q sountrack. Asserts that because fictional puppet characters in a musical declare everyone has bigoted, prejudiced, and/or ignorant thoughts, therefore the speaker's own bigoted, prejudiced, and/or ignorant comments are justifiable, and should not be used against the speaker.

ARGUMENT FROM ZERO-SUM SOCIETY:

A particular type of fallacy stemming from a faulty premise. Asserts that there must only be a limited amount of social justice to go around; therefore, if social justice is extended to one group, it must therefore have been taken away from another group [usually the speaker's own].

ARGUMENT FROM EXPLICIT ENDORSEMENT:

A particular type of either/or fallacy, often found coupled with the Zero-Sum Society argument. Asserts that because a particular movement works to help one group, it must therefore work to hurt all other groups.

ARGUMENT FROM LARRY ELDER:

Asserts that because a member of one group tells another group something that second group wants to hear, therefore what the spokesman says is true from his group as a whole. Named for conservative commentator Larry Elder, who asserts in his book 10 Things You Can't Say In America that black people are more racist than white people; thus, white people ought not to be called out for racism any more.

ARGUMENT FROM ERIC CARTMAN:

Asserts that willful ignorance of someone else's difference [or, more precisely, the significance of someone else's difference] is a good thing. (The corellary is patronizing denigration of those who insist upon their own differences--also known as "God, Why Does Everything Have To Be A Race Thing With You People?" argument] So named for the following dialogue exchange near the end of South Park: Bigger, Longer, and Uncut--

CARTMAN: Kyle, I'm sorry Kyle. All those times I said you were a big dumb Jew? I didn't mean it. You're not a Jew.

KYLE: ...Yes, I am. I am a Jew, Cartman!!

CARTMAN: No, no, Kyle; don't be so hard on yourself.

ARGUMENT FROM OFFENSE:

A twofold assertion. First, asserts that an opinion is correct because it causes offence in the speaker's audience. Second, asserts that because people are offended by the speaker's opinion, the speaker is therefore a champion of truth and justice under attack from a bunch of thin-skinned censors who constantly work to silence the speaker.
Tags: politics
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