Miles Coverdale (manos74) wrote,
Miles Coverdale
manos74

  • Mood:

Oh HELL yes!


DANDYWILBER'S FREE TUTORIAL ON HOW TO TYPE/SPELL/SPEAK CORRECTLY!
Or: How to sound mildly intelligent!
When to properly use your or you're (you are)
YOUR
your
adj. The possessive form of you
1. Used as a modifier before a noun: your
boots; your accomplishments

2. A person's; one's: The light switch is on
your right


So, what does it mean?

Your is a word that states that the possession of some object or abstract idea is in the possession of you. The hat is not you're hat. It is YOUR hat. As you're cannot be used in place of your, the same is true for the reverse of this lesson. Your cannot be used in a sentence when the meaning of the word should be "you are," such as you are not very intellectual or you are in possession of the grammar skills of a 4-year old. This is where YOU'RE comes in, not your. See the right side, YOUR right side (of the computer screen) for instructions on how to use YOU'RE.

Some examples:

This is your pink flamingo.
Our Lady Peace is your favorite band.
Please, stop your car and run into oncoming traffic.
YOU'RE
you're
Contraction of you are.

contraction
n. The act or process of shortening
1. The shortening of a word, or of two
words, by the omission of a letter or
letters, or by reducing two or more
vowels or syllables to one; as, ne'er for
never; can't for can not; don't for do
not; it's for it is.

Huh?

In short, you're means you are. We do all know what "you" and "are" mean, don't we? I should surely hope so! One uses you're when they wish to speak regarding a person.

Some examples:

You're not a very nice individual.
You're coming with me this evening.
You're not serious, are you?
Post this tutorial in your journal!!


Bow down to the Grammar King!

.... or, y'know, not.
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